Versus the Long Term

Ramesseum, the mortuary temple for Ramses the Great

I am sitting down this morning with a cup of coffee looking out on a rainy day.  It’s true summer and it is still raining, which is beginning to piss me off just a little.  But it will be summer again soon and my little-bitty garden likes the moisture.

Today is a lesson in perceptions and consequences.  It is also a primer of why, unless some remarkably cruel policies are put in place soon, we will fail in staying a first world power and will go the way of Greece.  There isn’t any moralizing here.  What a democracy spends its money on is its own damn business.  The taxpayer who whines about government largess usually just whines about government largess that he doesn’t receive.

Neither is this going to be a defense of the idea that the sad set of rituals and symbols that pass for the American Dream are worthy of any spirited defense.   This quote from a recent posting on The Automatic Earth says quite a bit about the current state of affairs.

Some of us chase dreams of wealth, while others simply dream of happiness. But we – almost – all have cars and TV sets and computers and many other possessions that are so ubiquitous in our societies that we don’t even ask anymore why we have them, or what we would do without. We unquestioningly assume they contribute to what we perceive as happiness.

Nope, this is merely a discussion of what I see as the most likely future.  It isn’t a polemic about how, should we choose, we could change the trajectory of a failing country.  It is a simple set of observations about how the change will come to us unbidden and out of our control.

Consider for a moment, this little gem:

United States Population Pyramid for 2010
Age and sex distribution for the year 2010:
Thanks to http://www.nationmaster.com

We have a 300-odd million total population.  Take 80 million off the top as being under 19yo and not really in the work force.  The 19-24 group is sitting on a 20% unemployment rate.  The main body of the employables is at the 24 to 60 range which gives us around 150 million folks in the truly productive workforce.  Sixty-three million folks are above sixty.

Doing a little unauthorized math here, and considering a 63% labor participation rate, for the main body of the labor force (24-60) I am figuring that only 94 million folks are out there working in a serious way (please, don’t bring me to task with some lame anecdote about how some person is really still fabulously productive while celebrating his 99th birthday, I am unconcerned with statistical outliers which make you feel better about getting old).

OK, so the real magic number is ninety-four million supporting two-hundred and fourteen million, or one productive worker supporting 2.27 non-productives human who has a set of desires similar to those who are working along with a fully formed set of rights to vote and petition government.

Now let us look at the levels below the >60 crowd on the histogram.  It is here that I am going to concentrate my arguments.  If there is an age group where long-term thinking is possible that is the age cohort of 25-50.  Simply put, this group has sufficient time remaining in their productive years to plan and execute difficult tasks with a project horizon greater than ten years.  The folks below this age group aren’t truly fully formed yet (but they are pretty damn close).  The folks above them are scrambling like maniacs on the supremely difficult task of getting ready for old age, a task which is becoming increasingly dicey.

There are right around 100 million folks in the 25 to 50 age group.  I am going to arbitrarily assign them a higher workforce participation (70%) than the average and make them a group of around 70 million souls in full productive mode, or twenty-two percent of the population.   It is my belief that this is not an adequate number to support a population the size of the US.  This doesn’t even take into account the number of folks who aren’t working full time or who are not really productive but who are pulling down a salary anyway (probably a distressingly large number).

These seventy million souls would, if allowed the access to resources, could theoretically put together a long-term project that could allow the successful transition to a lower-energy society.  The project would necessarily be quite expensive and have a high possibility of failure, but it could be done, allowing access to the necessary resources and allowing for a “what’s in it for me” to the persons executing the project.

But right now our resource base is steadily dwindling.  Our country’s wealth is questionable and we may potentially be technically insolvent at this point.  The limited resources will be allocated per democratic whim to the 78% of the population with no real desire to lose access to the resources that gives their lives comfort and continuity.  Not to mention the truly astounding amount of fraud that has sucked a major portion of the wealth of the country into the bottomless pit of the rentier class and out of the means of productivity.  I won’t even begin to discuss the truly amazing amount of debt that is hanging over our heads.

I don’t see a way out of the decline and fall of the Imperial United States in the next ten years.  I am hoping for a deus ex machina, but I think that I will be sorely disappointed.  The resources needed to execute a difficult long-term strategy are being sucked dry by an overlarge assembly of needy and low-productivity youngsters and oldsters with a set of manufactured needs incapable of being met.

Now, if I were a nicer person, I would probably have phrased the last statement differently.  It by no means is the “fault” of these folks.  But the cruel reality of economics is that one has to put in more than one takes out to make the equation balance.  We have too many people who by dint of age, ability, education, an intelligence cannot meet this goal.  There is a tendency to demonize these folks.  Parasite, welfare queen, greedy pensioner, shiftless, etc., etc., etc.  None of these appellations are valid, they just stem from the anger of folks who cannot access resources to attempt something to help the problem or who themselves want more than what they already have and aspire to the rentier class.

So the many will take away from the whole the means necessary to slow and control the transition to a low-energy future.  The few that will be sucked dry in the process and the collapsed system itself will serve as a rich compost for the next system to grow from.  DOn’t think for a moment that I see this as the preferred option, it just appears to be the most likely.

All these things have always been true.  They raised their heads in the time of Sargon and Augustus.  Louis Quatorze knew it in his soul and Queen Victoria laid her dainty head on a pillow of these simple truths.  The collapse of the American empire is not the end of the world or the end of America.  It will be what the next phase of America will grow from.  Things will not be worse.  They will be different.

The new America will not spring into being fully formed as did Minerva, but will be a series of missteps and contradictions.  Might be a theocracy in there.  Might have a touch of a military dictatorship.  Might have a new republic, the whole place may split into a set of warring states.  Hell, we may well even manage to keep hold of the current constitution and make adequate changes to allow it to survive.

But all of these futures will be from a smaller and more constrained set of economic ideas.  The idea that all can live as owners of richesse and comfort on an ever increasing scale will be finally put to rest.

Parthian Shot

A Different Path

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A Substitution of Faiths


I always take the time to read “The Automatic Earth” and the wonderful commentary and articles that make it a treasure.  The post in question is “Ruminations on Faith and Humanity“.  But I was genuinely shaken to see the following quote expounded upon by the reader “Alfbell” in the most recent post.

No system will ever be successful until the human mind, and the spiritual being that utilized it, have been isolated and fully understood. Psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis, et al. have failed in this area as well. Very too bad because THIS is the key to man’s future survival.

Find the source of evil and destructive intentions; the need to dominate; the need to destroy what another creates; man’s inhumanity to man; man’s illogic; man’s low level of morality; man’s “animalistic” tendencies; man’s inability to predict consequences; etc. and you will save mankind.”

Wow, where do I start?  Just another go at having a particular, parochial set of thoughts shoved down the throats of others in a sincere, open-hearted attempt to “help”

The human condition is quite simply not one of perfectibility.   That is not the point of human existence.  The point of human existence is the messy striving and learning and other such unpleasantness that makes up our sin-stained existence.  In a very real sense, the world defined by Alfbell is not one where I wish to live.

We are not proto-gods, trying to build ourselves into perfect, luminous creatures.  We are a bunch of apes who are trying to get along in a world where we have overshot (by a large margin) the constraints placed on us by a limited world.  We are now just getting this little factoid through our collective thick skulls.  What is proposed by the oh-so sincere readers of the Automatic Earth is a more thorough understanding of the animal nature so that we can save mankind.  Well folks, I think that it is pretty easy to figure out that a pretty complete understanding of human nature is quite possible.  Just ask the folks on Madison Avenue.

An individual has a chance of figuring out how to rid himself of illogic, to control his baser desires, to use analytical skills to better produce desired outcomes for himself, etc., etc., etc.  But that ability is located solely in the individual.  The ability for an external effect to change or “make right” another individual is laughably limited.  But that doesn’t mean most people don’t want to give it a try.  But what most people want is for the great mass of other folks to just do whatever the person speaking wants them to do.  There is no particular moral suasion that is de facto “right”.  There are only personal preferences.  What most folks want is to die well-fed and comfortably in bed with a minimum of fuss and bother and pain.

Yet individuals such as “Alfbell” request and beseech over and over again for “more study” to be put into the nature of mankind so that the unwashed masses can made civil and subsequently be invited in for high tea.  What will be done with the “additional study” will be what has happened every time.  Those who desire power and influence will use that same information to garner their heart’s desire.

Folks, there is a reason that there are different disciplines for psychology, sociology, and economics.  There is also a reason why all must be taken into consideration when anyone who is intellectually honest makes any call for action in the world of men.  We are not fragments of the divine encased in a vulgar shell.  We are messy, somewhat greedy apes with the odd bit of potential showing through.  The actions of the individual are different from the actions of crowd and different still from the sciences of greed.  Taking all three together and trying to make some “Grand Unified Theory” has been a fruitless and sterile bit of research for going onto 12,000 years.

Folks who come to the Church of the Doomer and its silly assortment of motley priests and deacons are partaking in that oldest of human traits, the tribe.  When they do so and folks start coalescing around a one set of sect-leaders or another, they are just looking for the seed to create a movement to shove their flavor of the truth down the throats of an unwilling world.  Consider another quote from the same article:

Candace asks…

“What I’m trying to figure out is if we all fail to be our best selves at least some of the time, are there any structures we can impose on ourselves that will at least keep us from causing massive damage to ourselves and the planet?”

Folks, my real and true belief is that, barring alien intervention or a sudden insight into the laws of physics which allows a shortcut around the second law of thermodynamics, our descendants will be living in a world populated by around a billion and a half people by 2200.  Now, some of the faint of heart might immediately start shrieking and gibbering and pulling their hair and begin mouthing loaded words like “near extinction”.  Nonsense.  It will just be Professor Ehlich contentedly having the last word.  The earth will abide.

The train has already left the station on the current overpopulation on “Mam Gaia” and the concomitant damage to the environment.  The work-arounds and patches that have allowed the current state of affairs are beginning to fray pretty badly.  The downslope is now ahead of us.  No amount of “spiritual” effort will help anyone in the long run except as helping in the crossing we will all make.

Economics boils down we all want more than our share.  Sociology boils down that when you get us together in large groups, all bets are off.  Psychology boils down to the fragile and flawed set of tools that we have developed to understand a world well out of our control.  When you begin tacking words like spirituality, what you are trying to do is grab some shred of an erstwhile moral high ground and use it as a tool to shove your desires and expectations down the throats of others.

Parthian Shot

Down by Vancouver Lake in the Winter

Serapeum

5th century scroll which illustrates the destruction of the Serapeum by Theophilus (from Wikipedia)

We are in a collapse.  Yea.  There really isn’t a great deal that I can do about it, I made my bets long ago and they sure as hell didn’t come in the way that I wanted them.  Doesn’t prevent me from moving on and getting things done day to day.

I think the collapse is going to be a long, drawn out affair.  since I am pushing 60, I doubt seriously that I will see the end of it.  Some of my longer-lived contemporaries might see it start to get some real traction, but my ge-ge-generation will be in the ground before the fewmets well and truly hit the fan.  That this is more than somewhat unfair in the long-term is a bit of an understatement.

That leaves my generation the conundrum of what to do in our waning days?  We caused the problem with our greed and shortsightedness, but we don’t have the time to execute any serious change to the system in order to forestall the collapse.  We sit here stagnant, starting to receive unwelcome junk mail from the AARP and being offered senior citizens discounts at restaurants.  We are all trying very hard to figure out how to retire to our comfortable dreams of golf and sloth.  But the worldview and dreams that led us to this impasse is proving rather fragile in light of the chickens currently coming home to roost.

What we can do to help stave of the length and severity of the coming reformation is considered anathema to the way we have spent our lives.  We have built our lives around profligacy and waste.  We eat microwavable meals off of plastic dishes which we throw away.  We measure our affluence with disposable cars which mark us as “trash” in five years.  We have no concrete grounding other than the subtly whispered and subliminal idea that if we have more, we can be more.

What the boomers need to do is start becoming an example of where the world needs to go.  But I really can’t see this happening as I remember clearly the choices that the same boomers made in the 1980’s.  I remember back in the early eighties, I read a book named “Voluntary Simplicity” by Duane Elgin.  Fairly good book, printed back in the day before the Boomer’s turned traitor and became even more despicable copies of the men in the grey flannel suit who were their fathers.  I used to try and get folks to read it, but the ideas of enough and living simply were rejected then and now by an entire generation along with the teaching of Ehlich and Carson.  We went for the gusto and created a culture that strip-mined everything that it could lay it’s hands on.

So, now the boomers, if they want to be remembered by the future as anything other than the self-absorbed children that destroyed a world, will have to make a complete change in their lives.  They will have to take a lead role in the destruction of the monumental temple of the self-indulgent material that is their current legacy.  They will have to take their place in a world of sustainability instead of retreating to well-defended islands of excess and calling it their due.

The reason that I don’t think that sacrifice and maturity will ever color the boomer’s legacy is simply that they don’t know any better.  They have been force fed a false life by Madison avenue and their social betters for so long that they have no remaining dreams of their own, just a distant longing caused by a materialist culture that has told them they don’t have enough.  Martha Stewart is their high priestess, passing off transient fashion as culture.  Mitt Romney is their Archbishop, telling them that wealth made from destruction is the same as wealth built from creation.  They have created a tawdry little world, built of tackiness and self-importance, all dusted with a light coating of fraud.

What I think that I am saying is the the generation that spawned the hippies and watched the last great movements of the civil rights period are probably not up to the task of changing enough to teach the world a new way.   They want to claim responsibility for the efforts that came to fruit in the sixties, but in truth they were bystanders only.  The anti-war movement, the civil rights movement, and the environmental movement were all the last gasp efforts of the generation that came to age during the great depression.  The boomers just made a lot of noise and grabbed credit for anything that they took on as that week’s fashion.  None of the movements took hold, none of the changes lasted.

Now is the time for these movements to come back to the fore.  But it isn’t going to be the boomers that will take the lead.  Oh, I think that there will be a lot of boomers who will try to run out in front of the movement and claim it to be their, but it just won’t work this time.   The generations who will be doing the change will see the “leaders” that the boomers try to put in place as the Quislings that they are.  No one is going to pay any attention to the tired ravings of a egomaniac defending his summer homes.

So keep an eye out.  We are moving slowly into a storm.  The rain will be coming stronger in the coming years.  The youngling will start taking charge soon and the boomers will weep when they see the remainder of their greedy “dreams” taken from them in their dotage.

Parting shot (Thank you Mr. Michaelson for the idea)

Trees and Lake

Through the trees at Burnt Bridge Creek

Accomplishments I haven’t

I haven’t felt much need lately to write.

Oh, I still feel that the world is a huge circus, and somehow the clown car has taken center ring.  But writing about the foolishness and the hypocritical posing of the 1% who rule us has lost its appeal for right now.

The world is forever in the process of becoming.  The worldviews that we cling to are transient, even within your own lifetime.  So why sit down in the morning and scream and gnash your teeth about some perceived injustice when other such injustices that happened in the past have turned out to be nothing but minor historical footnotes?

The Archdruid seems to make the most sense.  He talks about the need to decouple our lives from the circus and start down the path to a deindustrial future.  All well and good.  But making that kind of stuff happen in you life in hard to do in a society which hasn’t come to grips with the necessity.

Parting shot (Thank you Mr. Michaelson for the idea) :

The youngest took this picture while we were out on a walk

My muse is out

Been a couple of weeks since I had anything that I wanted to write about,  Went through a paranoid phase where I freaked out because my electronic life was so open to monitoring.  But then I had an epiphany.

“Who the fuck cares?”

Then I went over to Dmitry Orlov’s place and read this little nugget.  It convinced me that maybe I was obsessing over nada.  As usual, Dmitry seems to have the attitude that I would love to have.

So, I rebuilt my shiny new laptop with linux so that I am back at my comfort level and got everything together to get back in the fray of writing.  But then a funny thing happened.  I can’t think of a damn thing to write about.  Nothing.

It seems like everybody and everything is holding it’s breath right now.  I liken the state of the nation and the world as equivalent to the period of time after you have repaired something and you want to see if the fix actually worked.  So you let things run and watch it, hoping that the fix that you put in actually worked.

Panting After a New Jerusalem

Or, the Les Religieux takes another stab at control

A couple of weeks ago, Time magazine published an article concerning the nature of heaven as seen by a subset of the current crop of evangelical Christians in the US. As is the norm for a Time article, the work is kinda fluffy and cute. It pays slightly more than a minimum of attention to other points of view and simplifies the matter for the masses, but the article itself helps to focus of one of the leading issues in our country today, that is, the almost poisonous effect that religion has upon the national dialog.

Now, one would think that the article in question is innocuous. “Why, look at those Christian youth, idealistically trying to make the world a better place!” is probably the effect that the article’s author was trying to make. But the truth of the matter is, that if the evangelical Christians are serious about this, there is a decent chance that what we are seeing is the beginning of the recruitment drive for the next set of crusades.

Think about it for a bit. Christian theologians, sensing that their stale and primitive beliefs do not engage an activist, educated, and unemployed youth, come up with an old variant of standard Christian fare wh

ere Christians can make the world better and make it more to their liking. Sounds to me like the recipe for a new run at sixteen century Amsterdam than a willingness to take on the problems of the world. I have never found a Christian mass movement that didn’t have at its core the desire to tell everyone around them what to do. So the heaven on earth that they propose will probably have more to do with Calvin’s Geneva than world where free will and individual liberty reign.

One can go back to the thirty-years war to see the scars that this kind of thing takes. How many were slaughtered outside Frankenhausen because of an arrogant theologian’s desire to see his opinions about a mystery forced upon an unwilling world? Are Botticelli’s paintings absent in our lives because of a secular leader’s fever dreams?

When I think of the current class of clowns passing themselves off as Christian theologians here in the US, I don’t know about you, but Margaret Atwood’s “A Handmaids Tale” is more likely than an earthly paradise. The folks pushing this are wedded to an idealized past, where the patriarchal ruled the roost, women knew their place, and children were seen and not heard. Doesn’t sound one bit attractive to me.

US history is littered by the dead husks of movements like this. The failure of the temperance movement and prohibition stands as the most recent failure. But it appears to be a consistent desire of a significant minority of Americans to shove their religious views down all others’ throats. This is just the latest iteration. We learned in out “history” books that the pilgrims came to Plymouth Rock to establish religious freedom. But what is not noted, or suffered with silence, is that they outlawed every “non-protestant” religion, persecuted the Jews, and forcibly as well as non-forcibly converted every “Heathen Indian” that they could lay their hands on.

I think that a large portion of the population has this desire to enforce uniformity at all costs. Religion is the way that most of here in the US try to do so. Little fishes on signs show that you are dealing with the washed. Big suburban mega-churches allow the remaining fragments of the middle class to convene in their uniformity. If you have ever been to Utah, you are fully aware of the stifling and intrusive nature of a dominant church.

In our society, we have always allowed this to occur. I can’t figure it out. We are currently in one of our “Christian Nation” modes where it becomes worse than usual. When you look at the growth of the suburban churches, the jingoism and self-absorption of the taught faith, you get a recipe for folks walking around in crisp, freshly ironed matching shirts. This trend will be exacerbated by the high unemployment and culture of entitlement that permeates the youth here in the USA. When you have a group of young people at loose ends, things start getting strange. When you have a group of young people who imbibed with their mother’s milk a huge boatload of self-esteem and then hit a hard world where around 50% are unemployed, things will get even stranger. When the country that they live in is armed to the teeth, with a military that is being de-funded and de-mobilized, you may very well be looking at some very interesting times ahead

No, we are too missionary and too self-absorbed a culture to ever allow anyone to stray from our messianic Christianity and pseudo-democracy. This is merely the latest little effort by the folks who brought you religious freedom for protestant Christians and vicious repression for anyone who saw things differently than they did. When you look at these folks want, they want to address the economic, environmental, sociological degradation of this country with a set of rules established first in the Tanakh by a set of nomadic pastoralists of the twelfth century BCE. I am certain that this will work out well in a society based on Onanism.

I tend to think that there is a heaven. It probably is not a version of the standard fare where angel strum and youthful bodies are reunited with the mature minds. I can’t really say what I think that it will be. I have a feeling that, as with most spiritual mysteries, there cannot and should not be a set of answers established by earth-bound religious authorities and enforced by the secular arm of the same.

I think that all movements like this always end up tragically for everyone.

Another Ozymandias

I sincerely hope that some of you will take some time to read Neal Stephenson’s recent essay title “Innovation Starvation” over at the World Policy Institute’s website. As usual, Mr. Stephenson writes very well, but in this case, I find myself in a rare moment of disagreement with his views.

Mr. Stephenson paints an odd picture recounting the glory days of the past. He bemoans the loss of our ability to execute on big projects. He seems to have the usual boomer mishmash in his head of how noble these gestures were, how grandiloquent their concept, how noble their execution. His arguments are vague, making a point by point rebuttal difficult, but he is out of line on this one.

The Apollo missions were and extraordinary waste of time and money. They were an overly expensive publicity to stunt to show our macho. End of sentence. The Russians were in the fool-the-masses game, so our politicians had to throw bones the way of our masses. It was stupid. It only took place because a serial philanderer and mediocre president needed to take the public’s gaze off his series of missteps and stupid decisions.

Nope, we were proceeding nicely with the X-15. We had been heading higher and higher in a low-cost, thoughtful manner. As you all are fully aware, we can’t have any of that thoughtful, incremental crap. No, we had to go for the grand, inefficient, thoughtless wastes of time and money that makes us proud to be Americans. The X-15 would have worked us up through the process of injecting stuff into space without the flamboyant excesses of the Saturn 5 and the media circus of the Mercury Seven. The “manned space flight” programs sucked the wind out of the more rational program. Hell, I can even remember watching the flights on the carpet at my Grandmother’s house with my uncle. Some of my best memories are from this time. But with all the glory of the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions, it was still the X-15, the Dyna-Soar and the F-104 that hung by fishing line from the ceiling of my bedroom.

We want things big, but in a sense, you look at the big things that we have accomplished, and they will be nothing but the feet of the statue of Ozymandias in no time flat. The Apollo flights came to nothing. The interstate highways system will continue crumbling as it’s use becomes more and more constrained by costs. Big projects make us think that we are more than what we are. Small projects teach us what can be done and how to do the useful things.

But you look at the history of big projects here in the US. Most of what we considered “noble” projects were fantastic boondoggles for a particular segment of the financial elite. The railroads profited enormously from the golden spike, far beyond a reasonable payoff for their work. The two world wars made huge money for the industrialists, we are still trying to get their fingers off our throat (to date, we have failed). The Space programs really haven’t yielded much other than the circuslike fanfare that precedes each program. But the truth be told, I cannot think of any “big ticket” item that truly contributed to the good of the taxpayer. Projects like this are ephemeral shadows of the pyramids, but in this case, the success will be a mere myth without substance, a picture of a man in an odd suit saluting a flag on a bleak plain.

So now, the billionaires want in on their share of the immortality pie. A group of internet billionaires and some rich celebrities want to capture a 500 ton asteroid and steer it into earth orbit so that they can mine it. I find it comical in the extreme that this is probably going to be allowed to happen. We of course know how to do everything smashingly well over in NASA land. Mistakes such as this one won’t occur again because the oversized egos of the folks who brought you Google and the hack who wrote an overblown morality play about resource extraction by corrupt corporations are on the team. What could possibly go wrong?

I realize that authors, poets, and other such icons cannot help but think of themselves as visionaries, but the truth of the matter is, no act of imagination is up to the complexity of executing in the real world. In a real sense, the problems of the world are due to big stuff. The creation of the auto industry was big stuff. The over-centralization of industries and capital allows the execution of big stuff.

No Mr. Stephenson, the projects that you espouse aren’t what is needed. What is need is years of patient work trying to come to grips with the knowledge we have acquired so nilly-willy over the past two hundred years. We don’t need new drugs, we need a more thorough understanding of what we have. We don’t need a space program to fling a lucky elite off planet, we need a way to depopulate the belt of wreckage circling our planet. We don’t need a gang of thieves swinging missiles into near earth orbit for their aggrandizement, we need to spend the time to mine and recover the enormous wealth and resources lying under the ground in dumps.

The only big project that I can think of that has done some overall good is the internet. If you don’t think that tossing cables across a world so that folks can freely communicate isn’t one of the biggest projects ever, put your thinking cap back on your head. Mr Steven’s own article shows the hard work and effort as well as any. But this wasn’t one of the flashy projects of which Mr. Stephenson speaks, just a lot of hard work that I hope can endure.

I realize that authors, poets, and other such icons cannot help but think of themselves as visionaries, but the truth of the matter is, no act of imagination is up to the complexity of executing in the real world. In a real sense, the problems of the world are due to big stuff. The creation of the auto industry was big stuff. The over-centralization of industries and capital allows the execution of big stuff. We are now finding out what happens to a society where the concentration of capital allows for such unrestrained acts of vanity.

All that another “big” project would do is distract us from the difficult and mature tasks that are pressing us. We keep bringing up the ideas of big shiny projects as a way to postpone the hard work of growing up and cleaning and organizing the mess where we currently live. I would posit that the bulk of our problems are stemming from the sin of pride. We consider ourselves, as Americans, to be the chosen of God.

Such drudgery is beneath us.

 

Ozymandias

Percy Blythe Shelly

 

I met a traveller from an antique land

Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone

Stand in the desert … Near them, on the sand,

Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,

And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,

Tell that its sculptor well those passions read

Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,

The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed:

And on the pedestal these words appear:

“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

Look on my works ye mighty and despair!”

Nothing beside remains. Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare

The lone and level sands stretch far away.